GV60 TEST OF NEW 'ACTIVE AIR SKIRT' TECHNOLOGY SHOWS IMPROVED RANGE, SIGNALING A PROMISING FUTURE FOR EVS

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SEOUL, Jan. 26, 2024 — In the fiercely competitive EV market, where carmakers strive to achieve longer driving ranges on a single charge, the significance of aerodynamics has become more critical than ever. Aerodynamics not only impacts power performance but also plays a vital role in driving stability and wind noise. 


Hyundai Motor Group (the Group) has embarked on a notable advancement in this field with its latest innovation, known as “Active Air Skirt (AAS),” which aims to minimize aerodynamic resistance at high speeds, thereby enhancing the driving range and stability of EVs. 


AAS, which operates variably based on the vehicle’s speed, adjusts the airflow entering through the lower bumper of a vehicle, effectively controlling the turbulence generated around the vehicle’s wheels during high-speed driving. As a result, the vehicle is able to travel faster and cover greater distances. 


The Group announced earlier this week that it has applied for related patents in Korea and the United States, with plans underway to consider mass production once it completes durability and performance tests. 
 

A recent test on the Genesis GV60 has already yielded positive results. 


By implementing AAS on the GV60, the Group was able to decrease the drag coefficient (Cd) by 0.008, improving drag by 2.8 percent. This translates to an estimated additional range of 6 kilometers. 


Cd quantifies the drag, or resistance, experienced by an object when it moves through a fluid environment like air or water. 

240126_GV60 TEST OF NEW 'ACTIVE AIR SKIRT' TECHNOLOGY SHOWS IMPROVED RANGE, SIGNALING A PROMISING FUTURE FOR EVS_2

 

Installed between the front bumper and the front wheels of the vehicle, AAS remains hidden during normal driving conditions but is activated at speeds above 80 kilometers per hour, when the aerodynamic resistance exceeds the rolling resistance. It retracts again at speeds below 70 kilometers per hour to prevent frequent operation within a specific speed range. 


AAS is capable of operation even at speeds above 200 kilometers per hour, thanks to a rubber material on the lower part, which reduces the risk of external objects bouncing off and causing damage. 


AAS covers only the front tire area rather than the entire front of the vehicle primarily due to the flat floor of the “Electric Global Modular Platform (E-GMP)" that serves as the foundation for the Group’s EVs. This particular design allows AAS to more effectively enhance aerodynamic efficiency when it’s specifically focused on the front tire area. 


With AAS, the force pushing the vehicle toward the road surface, known as downforce, is also increased, which improves the vehicle’s grip on the road and ultimately enhances high-speed stability. 


“This technology is expected to have a greater impact on SUVs, where it’s challenging to improve aerodynamic performance,” remarked Sun Hyung Cho, the Group’s Vice President and Head of Mobility Body Development.